fair languages hinglish

The Hinglish Project – Mashing the Roman Alphabet with Devanagiri

fair languages hinglish

Is your native language Hinglish? Probably not as Hinglish is not so much a real language than a fun project of Incredible India, a tourism campaign launched by the Indian government.

The idea behind the Hinglish Project is to bring the Hindi language closer to tourists and other visitors to India as the script can be seen all across the country and it looks very different from the Roman alphabet many people around the globe are used to.

Therefore, the Hinglish Project developed a font that combines letters from the Roman alphabet with letters from the Devanagiri alphabet that have the same sound when spoken. Sounds confusing? Above this post you can see Fair Languages written in Hinglish script and below you can see the entire Roman alphabet spelled in Hinglish.

Hinglish Alphabet

This is only possible because Hindi as well as the Roman languages are part of the big group of Indo-European languages and therefore share a common pool of pronunciation. Kirsten just recently shared some interesting research which claims the cradle of all Indo-European languages could be found in Anatolia.

Now, does the Hinglish Project actually help anyone to learn Hindi? Probably not. Even if you took the Hinglish spelling book and succeeded in pronouncing a word written in Hindi on a sign you would still have no clue what the word actually means.

Nevertheless, I think this is an interesting project and if the reasoning behind Hinglish is to spark an interest in the Hindi language and script, it worked sure for me. It is also a great example of what you can do with clever typeface design and  the merchandise the Hindi Project is showcasing on their website looks really neat!

Last but not least you can download the script for free on the Hinglish Project website or directly type messages in your browser and then share them with your friends on Facebook or Twitter.

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Kay Alexander is the co-founder and review editor of Fair Languages. He is also the producer of EDUKWEST. You can follow him on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.
  • http://www.facebook.com/gmachlan Louis George Machlan

    I find it interesting that they have only recently applied this principal. Many Boy Scouts of my generation learned Morse Code with the same system by arranging the dots and dashes to letters or pictograms.

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